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From Ruth Ewan's exhibition. A teal-green object shaped like a witches' hat sits on the floor. Behind, there are the words 'Nae Sums'

Ruth Ewan

Brank & Heckle

13 August - 09 October 2011

Ruth Ewan's first major solo show in the United Kingdom explored notions of silence and protest by combining the artist's ongoing interest in radical histories with new work responding to Dundee's social heritage.

From Ruth Ewan's exhibition. A white statue of a naked person throwing their hands up in the air.

Ewan is interested in viewing history as alive, relevant and capable of configuring the future. Conceptually led but socially realised, her work takes specific historical images and sounds and renders them active through use.

Brank & Heckle combines two conflicting ideas: 'Brank' refers to the Scottish word for the Scold's bridle used to silence and torture women, while 'Heckle' refers to an act of spontaneous vocal engagement, said to have originated in Dundee's jute mills.

Born in Aberdeen, Ruth Ewan grew up in Fife and studied at Edinburgh College of Art. Her work was featured in 2009's Younger than Jesus at the New Museum in New York, and in Altermodern: Tate Triennial. Her project We Could Have Been Anything That We Wanted To Be can currently be seen as part of the second Folkestone Triennial, and she has recently been announced as a contributor for next yearÂ’s Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art.

Artist Video | Ruth Ewan on Brank & Heckle

Exhibition images

A mural for Ruth Ewan's exhibition. A black and white drawing shows a man on his knees begging at a man sitting on a block with a pound sign on it. Next to the drawing, there are the words 'Get off your knees!'
From Ruth Ewan's exhibition. Black cushions and bean bags surround a grey jukebox in DCA Galleries.
From Ruth Ewan's exhibition. A white statue of a naked person throwing their hands up in the air.
From Ruth Ewan's exhibition. A collection of small plants, some sitting on blue palettes.
From Ruth Ewan's exhibition. A teal-green object shaped like a witches' hat sits on the floor. Behind, there are the words 'Nae Sums'
From Ruth Ewan's exhibition. A small, potted plant that look like a bonsai tree is covered in colourful string.