View your saved tickets

DCA Archive

Ciné Sunday: Once Upon a Time in... Hollywood

Quentin Tarantino

We're thrilled to present Once Upon a Time in...  Hollywood in glorious 35mm! Tickets go on sale from Tue 30 July.

When the word broke that Quentin Tarantino was going to make a movie about the Manson murders, assumptions began that this would be another slick, energetic, uber-violent take on that famous moment in Hollywood history. And it is, sort of, but this sprawling story about tinsel-town is as much about the transient nature of fame, friendship and artistic success as it is about a murderous cult leader. It’s Quentin, Brad and Leo at their very best, and a fun cinematic rollercoaster ride for the entire three hours. A love poem to 1970s L.A., Once Upon a Time in... Hollywood is also a gift to every movie theatre running it this summer – this is a film that absolutely has to be seen in a cinema.

"A film that absolutely has to be seen in a cinema." 

In a cheerful double-act, Pitt and DiCaprio are best-buddy losers whose successful careers are waning. The ‘summer of love’ is over and a new 1970s dawn is coming. Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a has-been TV star whose ego and career has long been propped up by his sidekick and stunt double/driver Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt). But these two veterans aren’t going down without a fight, and while Rick struggles to get his bearings (and remember his lines) on the set of an art-house Western, Cliff is easily led astray by Pussycat (Margaret Qualley), the intriguing young hippy who lives on the commune at the old Spahn movie ranch. Thrown into the mix are Rick’s neighbours on Cielo Drive, new Hollywood royalty Sharon Tate (Margot Robbie) and Roman Polanski. As Rick and Cliff try to get their careers on track, they can’t help but look on enviously at the parties of the successful couple next door who seem to have it all... for now.

This is a film that has too many cinematic references to list here, but suffice it to say that each and every one of them is pitch perfect. As you’d expect from Tarantino, the banter is sharp and extremely funny but this is also a film with superbly crafted action sequences and tense set-pieces. In a departure from some of his more recent work, it’s also filled with tender moments and his obvious love for movies. Welcome back, old friend, and thank you from the bottom of our hearts for this movie magic.