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Echo + Harry Josephine Giles

#PatrickStaff

Echo is an evening of multidisciplinary presentations in response to The Prince of Homburg.

A longstanding part of the exhibition programme at DCA, Echo is designed to throw new light on the works displayed in our galleries by inviting other artistic voices into the building to respond to each show.

As part of this instalment, we have invited Orcadian writer and performer Harry Josephine Giles to respond to Patrick Staff’s exhibition.  Harry Josephine’s work is about what it feels like to live under capitalism, and how to survive and resist in a violent world. Their process is activist: making performance is a way to explore politics, performing a way to intervene. They combine participatory performance and public feeling – to feel with audiences and resist together. To Harry Josephine, feelings are not a soft form of politics: they are hard, edgy, scary and potent.

In advance of this response, there will be opportunities for other voices to present ideas. In past events, participants have presented a wide variety of new and existing works that they have made in response to, or think is relevant to, the work/themes in our exhibitions. These have included drawings, sculptures, short films, poetry, text readings, dance, music, and performance. If you would like to share your creative response to the work on show, please submit a short proposal (no more than 300 words) to exhibitions@dca.org.uk by Mon 8 July 2019.

About Harry Josephine Giles:

Harry Josephine Giles is a writer and performer from Orkney and based in Edinburgh. Their poetry collections Tonguit (2015) and The Games (2018) were both shortlisted for the Edwin Morgan Poetry Award, and Tonguit for the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. Harry Josephine was the 2009 BBC Scotland slam champion, founded Inky Fingers Spoken Word, and co-directs the performance platform Anatomy. Their participatory theatre has toured widely, including Forest Fringe (UK), NTI (Latvia), CrisisArt (Italy) and Teszt (Romania). Harry Josephine’s performance What We Owe was picked by the Guardian's best-of-the-Fringe 2013 roundup – in the “But Is It Art?” category.

www.harrygiles.org